Postpartum Exercises

Postpartum Exercises

16 Herbs Every Breastfeeding Mom Should Know About

16 Herbs Every Breastfeeding Mom Should Know About

16 Herbs Every Breastfeeding Mom Should KnowIt’s frustrating to begin and continue breastfeeding for the suggested six months to a year.

  • Thrush
  • Cracked nipples
  • Too much milk
  • Too little milk

Wouldn’t it be great if breastfeeding was easier?

We know it is the best food for our child and the benefits extend to the momma as well, as noted by The American Academy Of Pediatrics and here.

But, here’s the thing.. it’s not always that blissful.

Trust me, I tried breastfeeding twins!

I lasted about three weeks and then rushed to Amazon to buy formula at 3:00 am one night.

Chances are you’ve tried breastfeeding and now struggling with one of the many challenges we face – along with sleep deprivation and the stress of raising a little one.

But don’t worry, botanicals can provide great support during this season of your life.

And don’t forget.. not all botanicals are safe while breastfeeding.

The greatest risk occurs 3-10 days postpartum as the child’s tight junctions of their gut may not be closed, and the newborn is the most vulnerable to chemicals ingested by the mother at this time.

It would be wise to wait to use medications, or even essential oils, before two weeks of age due to your child’s immature gut, liver, and kidney function. This kidney clearance capacity increases and becomes fully by 4-5 months of age, therefore as your child grows the concerns of safety and allergies decrease.

“1% of the maternal dose of any medication will enter the milk, and with some exceptions up to about 10%.”

So how can you make breastfeeding a little easier?

In this post, I’m going to share my favorite herbal remedies for moms who are breastfeeding.

2 Botanicals For Sore, Cracked Nipples

Some amount of discomfort will occur with breastfeeding, especially within the first week of latching. Nipples may become sore, cracked and may even bleed. Contact a lactation consultant or midwife if there is continued difficulty or infections due to latching.

#1 Calendula
Calendula is used topically for the treatment of minor inflammations of the skin. Typically used as an oil or salve. Apply to cracked, dry nipples to prevent infection and soothe inflammation. Caution: The oil or salve may stain clothing and although there are no known risks with minimal ingestion, wipe off your nipple before breastfeeding again.

#2 Chamomile
The German Commission E. approves chamomile for the use of skin inflammation and bacterial skin diseases. Chamomile Matricaria oil has demonstrated activity against Candida albicans at the concentration of .7%.¹

Taking preventative steps to support your immune system, rest and apply an herbal salve will prevent cracked nipples which increase your risk of mastitis.

Euphorical Herbals has amazing products for your times of breastfeeding. 

Additional tips to reduce cracked nipples

  • Ensure proper latching
  • If nipples are sore or cracked, gently rinse and pat dry after each feeding
  • Avoid the use of breast pads, when possible, and spend time without a bra
  • Wash nursing bras regularly to avoid infection
  • Treat oral thrush in the newborn with yogurt and probiotics to prevent the spread to the nipple
  • Apply an herbal salve several times a day after nursing and wipe off before nursing again
  • When there is an infection, use an antimicrobial – like Echinacea– to support the mother’s immune system

3 Herbs For Plugged Ducts & Mastitis

Milk ducts can become inflamed, tender and distended creating a ‘plugged duct’, In mastitis, the plugged duct is accompanied by infection.

#1 Phytolacca 30C 

Personally, I liked to take homeopathic medicine when I had mastitis.  Along with Echinecea, this helped resolve the inflammation within minutes.  If you are having these symptoms, consider Phytolacca as a remedy. Click here to purchase. 

Dosing: Take 2 tablets, wait 20 minutes, take another 2 and you should see improvement.

“For sore, cracked nipples, which hurt when the baby nurses. One of the most commonly used remedies for mastitis, especially where the pains radiate from the affected area and the breast is hard and lumpy.  The patient may feel heavy with flu like symptoms, or may have a breast abscess threatening.” ¹

#2 Echinacea Tincture

Boost your immunity with Echinacea tincture.  In Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Years, Susan Weed recommends a dose of a 1/2 drop for every pound of body weight (so a 130 lb woman would take 65 drops). According to Kellymom.com, this dose can be taken up to 3-5 times per day. Susan Weed says even up to 12 times per day is fine and may be effective.

You can purchase the tincture here.

Dosing: 20-30 drops, 3-4x day

#3 Ashwagandha Tincture (Withania somnifera)

Known as a Category 1, safe adaptogen during breastfeeding, Ashwagandha can help reduce stress and ease the anxiety that may be causing the inflammation during breastfeeding. You can purchase a tincture here. 

Dosing: 20-30 drops, 3-4x day

Read more about natural treatment for breastfeeding moms @ Kelly Mom

5 Signs of Mastitis

  • fever as high as 104
  • local redness, hard tender inflamed area
  • chills
  • achiness
  • exhaustion

Diabetes, steroid use, and oral contraceptives may also increase the risk of candida mastitis.

Herbal Treatment For Mastitis

If you are experiencing recurrent breast infections, you may want to be evaluated for adequate nutritional intake.
Particularly see if you are low in:

  • Iron
  • Zinc
  • Protein
  • Vitamin c

Along with good nutrition, consider adding an adaptogen to support your immune system during this stressful time.
Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) and Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum) Tincture are considered safe adaptogens during breastfeeding.

Along with supporting your immune system with adaptogens, consider these tips to avoid mastitis.

  • Use compresses of hot water, ginger root or chamomile infusion.
  • Apply a poultice of freshly grated raw potato 2-3x day.
  • Take 1/2-1 tsp. of Echinacea tincture every 2-4 hours.
  • For high fever, drink teas of elderflower and spearmint.
  • To reduce muscle tension drink teas of lemon balm, chamomile, and catnip.
  • To relieve pain tinctures of crampbark, passion flower and hops tinctures can promote sleep and relieve pain.

Increase milk supply

Galactagogues are the main category of herbs that enhance milk production, but you’ll also want to address your stress with botanicals that soothe your anxiety in order to increase milk supply.

12 Herbs To Increase Your Milk Supply

  1. Marshmallow Root  (Althea Officinalis)
  2. Dill  (Anethum graveolum)
  3. Oats (Avena sativa) A cup of oatmeal every morning may help soothe digestion and increase milk supply!
  4. Caraway  (Carum carvi)
  5. Blessed thistle  (Cnicus benefictus)
  6. Fennel Seed (Foeniculum vulgare)
  7. Goat’s rue (Galega officinalis)
  8. Barley (Hordeum vlugare)
  9. Hops (Humulus lupulus)
  10. Anise seed (not Star anise) Pimpinella anisum
  11. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)
  12. Chaste berry (Vitex angus castus)

 

How can you increase your milk supply?

Mother's Milk Tea Blend

Ingredients

  • ea Recipe
  • MOTHER’S MILK TEA BLEND
  • • Chamomile Flowers 1 ounce
  • • Dried Catnip 1 ounce
  • • Fennel seeds 1/4 ounce
  • • Dried lavender flowers 1/8 ounce

Instructions

  1. Combine all the herbs.
  2. Put 1 tbs. of the mix in a cup and fill with boiling water.
  3. Cover and let steep for 10 minutes.
  4. Strain and drink plain or slightly sweetened. Dose; 1-3 cups/day.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://taragregorio.com/16-herbs-every-breastfeeding-mom-should-know-about/

Too much milk? Try these herbs to decrease your milk supply.

Conclusion

Botanicals can provide great support during this season of your life.  Particularly if you are getting recurring infections, antimicrobial can support your immune system and decrease your risk of infections.  To increase your supply, adding botanicals can help and then don’t forget to address your stress.

What botanicals do you use to support breastfeeding?

Leave a comment below.


References:

  • ¹https://www.homeopathycenter.org/breastfeeding
  • https://www.aap.org/en-us/advocacy-and-policy/aap-health-initiatives/Breastfeeding/Pages/Benefits-of-Breastfeeding.aspx
  • https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/115/2/496.full
  • https://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/herbs/fenugreek/
  • https://lllusa.org/
  • ¹Romm, Aviva, Botanical Medicine For Women’s Health

 

Warning! Are you experiencing pain from your C-section?

Warning! Are you experiencing pain from your C-section?

Let me guess.  You thought a C-section would be easier on your body, right?

Have you ever noticed pain in your groin, inner thighs or with sex?

It may be because of your scar tissue.

The scar tissue formed from C-sections, episiotomies, surgeries, and perineal tearing can cause numbness and an inability for the adhesions to lay down in a proper pattern, creating tension in your groin and inner thigh area.

Crazy thought, isn’t it?

Furthermore, if you have scar tissue internally, it may be affecting your organs.

(Here’s a nice image to demonstrate the pull of scar tissue)

Imagine what it would be like to be pain-free.  To enjoy sex again.  To have no trouble with your bladder or incontinence.

Ask yourself these questions…

9 Out Of 10 Moms Have These Symptoms From A C-section Scar

  1. pain during sex
  2. clitoral and/or labial pain
  3. feeling like you need to go to PEE a lot
  4. numbness around the scar
  5. lumpy or hard spots over the scar
  6. pelvic, low back and pain in the groin
  7. digestive troubles
  8. can’t feel your abdominals doing work

 

3 Symptoms You May Be Experiencing From An Episiotomy

    • difficulty going to the bathroom
    • pain/tension in your pelvis
    • pain or discomfort with sex

So, What can you do about your pain? In this post I”ll share how a scar massage can reduce your pain and improve your incontinence.

Step #1 Massage your scar. {keep in mind, I am not a massage therapist}

The scar tissue formed after an incision may not lay down as “neatly” and is less pliable and flexible. A gentle scar massage can “break-up” this tissue creating more freedom in the area and in your overall body and may reduce the tension you are feeling.

How soon can you practice a scar massage?

You want to wait for at least 6-weeks after any abdominal surgery and consult with your doctor before adding this in. Do not massage the scar if there is any oozing or redness. Please see your doctor!

How do you practice a scar massage?

There are 4 ways to do a scar massage

  1. massage gentle circles over the scar {and any area of tension}
  2. press and wiggle- press down and shift forward and back slightly
  3. go over the scar left to right and right to left
  4. use a SOFT massage ball/foam roller and gently sit on it and breathe for your perineal area

You can use coconut oil or any other oil to help the fingers skim over the skin.

Practice this for 1 minute most days of the week. Be gentle and over time increase your pressure.


Take your time and realize healing takes time. The best types of exercise for you are breathing, walking, core restoration and light bodyweight exercises until the scar tissue heals. Possibly 9-12 months.

Diet is also VERY important to heal the scar tissue. Make sure you are getting enough healthy protein at each meal to aid in your healing. 

Conclusion

In short, your scars from childbirth could be creating tension, pain, and in turn, affect your bladder control.  When the scar tissue is released, you will unwind years of tightness and be able to connect to your core AND pelvic floor with ease.

The first step is the hardest.  Have you tried massaging your scars from childbirth? I want to hear from you.  Tell me below in the comment section. 

Why pelvic floor exercises are perfect for your abdominal separation.

Why pelvic floor exercises are perfect for your abdominal separation.

There are two women… they both have an abdominal separation called diastasis recti.

One still looks pregnant.

The other woman.. has a flat stomach, but still struggles with pain and digestion.

Both women could benefit from connecting with their pelvic floor.

Think about this for a moment.

Your “core” is typically known as your abs and lower back and the muscles below your core are your pelvic floor muscles.

These muscles are affected whether you’ve had a vaginal birth (stretched) or C-section (your pelvic floor may be tight).

And… your pelvic floor muscles can be strengthened and stretched – just like any other muscle.

Wait! What?

Where is your pelvic floor?

These groups of muscles are found in between your pubic bone, sitz bones, and tailbone and form a sling around your rectum and vagina.

Amy SteinThey are stretched during vaginal birth.

They may be tight after a C-section – due to the surgery and your body wanting to protect you.

**The point is… you’ll want to get comfortable with your pelvic floor muscles after childbirth. 

But don’t forget… your pelvic floor muscles may be weak and long or strong and short depending on your unique body and the type of birth you’ve had.

So what can you do about it?

In this post, I’ll share symptoms of a tight or weak pelvic floor and how you can fix it. 

Weak pelvic floor symptoms

You may have a weak pelvic floor if you’ve had a c-section, have gained weight or do not exercise at all.  There is no judgment… these are the symptoms to look for:

  1. bladder leaking
  2. weak core
  3. low back pain
  4. pelvic organ prolapse

***You’ll want to strengthen your pelvic floor and hip muscles to reduce these symptoms.

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Pelvic Floor Muscle Pain

Your pelvic floor may be tight if you have pain down there. Signs of a tight pelvic floor are:

  1. You feel like you cannot take a deep breath
  2. You can’t release your abdominal area
  3. Inserting a tampon, finger, or having sex is uncomfortable
  4. You feel tense, all the time
  5. You may have constipation
  6. You may experience leaking
  7. You may have had a c-section and/or surgery

**If your pelvic floor is tight.  You’ll want to stretch and release your pelvic floor with breathing exercises, rolling, and massage.

Watch this video to learn how.

>>Engaging your pelvic floor is the first step in rehabbing your abdominal separation.<<

Miss this step and you may suffer for years to come.

I’d love to know your thoughts.  Have you had trouble with your pelvic floor muscles?

Comment below.


I am a licensed, full-scope midwife with a particular interest in issues of pelvic floor dysfunction. Before referring my own clients, I took Tara’s Pelvic Pow-her class as an exercise in due diligence. I found Tara to be exceptionally knowledgeable, supportive, and positive. The brilliant thing about this course is that she shares so many different tools and techniques. She provides a clear framework so that each student can easily figure out which of these will work best and create an effective, individualized home program that will be perpetually useful. With complete confidence, I recommend this course to anyone who needs to address pelvic floor issues.
-Megan O’Connor, MS, CM, LM, LMT

Want to learn more? Get on the Pelvic Pow-HER waitlist to learn how you can heal your abdominal separation without surgery.

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10 Things I would have done differently postpartum

10 Things I would have done differently postpartum

I cried when we left the hospital.

I was so afraid to go home with two babies and get back to real life where I had to cook, clean and care for two little ones. I was right to be afraid.

Our postpartum time was filled with so much chaos, crying and sleep deprivation.

We opened two businesses and had twins in the same year. I wouldn’t suggest it to anyone.

Five years later, we survived the fevers, the crying, the sleep training, the potty training and feeding them with only one experience of Mario choking on ice.

So, I’d love to share with you what I would do differently if I were to raise twins all over again.

#1 Ask for Help

I found it very hard to ask for help. I was a strong, independent woman and didn’t realize it’s ok to ask for help. Although friends and family are very busy, they want to help. I’m forever grateful to those who made us meals, held a baby for just a moment and ran after baby a, while I ran in the other direction for baby b. Thank you.

#2 Take supplements

I was so against supplements before giving birth. I wanted everything natural and thought I could get my vitamins and minerals from my food. I suffered from digestion problems, so taking anything scared me as I didn’t know enough. I feared taking anything at all that it may disrupt my digestion more. What I know now, is I lost a lot of blood giving birth, and it’s a traumatic, stressful event, the body needs more support. Postpartum women need iron, vitamins, digestive enzymes, EFA’s and probiotics to restore their gastrointestinal flora. Next time I would take supplements, especially magnesium to release the stress and tension!

Essential fatty acid supplementation (1-3 g/day combined EPA and DHA) and adequate cold water fish consumption during pregnancy and during the postpartum period may prevent or alleviate postpartum depression. ¹

#3 Improve my diet

The first six weeks were all about survival. Whatever you made me, I ate it. I woke up to coffee and had wine to wind down at night. The excessive caffeine contributed to my insomnia and created a terrible daily routine of anxiety. Next time, I would wake up with hot water and lemon and eat oatmeal to aid my digestion. I’d skip the caffeine, chocolate, and coffee.

#4 Skip the wine & beer

I found myself drinking Guinness as it was supposed to increase my milk supply. I would have a glass of wine or a drink to take the pain away in the evening. My body ached from sleeping just two hours most nights, and I was numbing the pain with alcohol. It didn’t help. It created anxiety and insomnia that lasted months. I’d skip the alcohol and drink herbal teas of chamomile, lavender, and stinging nettles.

#5 Take adaptogens sooner

Adaptogens are a category of herbs that help you adapt to stress. At the time of my children’s birth in 2013, I studied herbs for over six years but what I was not taking was adaptogens; like Ashwagandha or Reishi mushrooms. These herbs help the body modulate stress, reduce anxiety and ease insomnia. Ashwagandha, motherwort, and nettles are considered a L1 in the risk category for lactation risk.² For a list of herbs to avoid while breastfeeding see Kelly Mom’s website. 
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#6 Meet with a pelvic floor physical therapist

My six-week postpartum visit to the doctor was a disappointment. I asked her if I had a diastasis recti or a prolapse. She insisted everything was “fine.” I didn’t feel fine. It turns out I did have both. Meeting with a pelvic floor physiotherapist would have confirmed my biggest worries and eased some anxiety about my body. Locally, we love Dr. Ashely Hocutt. See her website here.

#7 Had my thyroid checked

Your thyroid can become hyperthyroid two to four months after birth and then hypothyroid for two to eight weeks. I treated my self for hyperthyroid with botanicals, but I would have loved to have a proper diagnosis. Dr. Aviva Romm discusses your postpartum thyroid here. 

#8 Waited to go back to work

In most cultures, the new mom is encouraged to rest for forty days. The family helps with food and caring for the newborn. The mom is invited to sleep and relax. Again, this was not my experience. The worries of the new business, the stress of not sleeping and the never-ending crying of babies were exhausting. If I were to do it again, I would have planned better to be able to step away from my business and ask for help.

#9 Moved in with my parents

I joke about this, but it’s the truth. Raising twins is hard. Very hard. Living with my family would have helped immensely. End of story.

#10 Hire a postpartum doula

Postpartum doulas are known as the “must have” accessory for new moms. They help new moms with the caring of the child so that would we can trust our inner momma instincts. They also may help with light housekeeping and meal preparation. I breastfed both of my kids for three weeks, and then I looked in the mirror and thought, I am never going to get out of the house if this doesn’t change. That night at 3:00 am I ordered formula and The Baby Whisperer on my phone. The next day Mario ate 5oz. of formula and slept seven hours! I would have loved for someone to tell me it’s ok to give your kids formula! Katherine Whiteside runs a free infant support group at the local libraries.  Sign up for Linda’s Ladies breastfeeding support group for postpartum questions and support.

If you are in the “thick of it” and your babies are young.  Don’t worry, it will get easier.

I hope some of these tips help you survive the chaos of raising little ones.

Warmly~

Tara

If you’re curious about integrating botanicals into your diet during the postpartum period, book a health consultation to get started. Book now. 


References:

¹Romm, Aiva; Botanical Medicine for Women’s Health

²Hale, Thomas; Medications and mothers milk 2017
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Are you still wasting money on pantyliners? 5 steps to stop incontinence.

Are you still wasting money on pantyliners? 5 steps to stop incontinence.

I know what you’re thinking.

Incontinence is just a part of aging.  Incontinence is because of your kids or menopause.

Are you sick and tired of the embarrassment of incontinence?

Picture this.  No more fear and frustration with running and jumping.

No more need to cross your legs when you cough or sneeze.

Saying YES to the things you love to do again.

Let’s dive in.

Which activities increase your leaking and which ones do not?

When does your leaking occur?

  • Is it during running? When you hit the hill?
  • Do you leak when you yell at your kids?
  • Does it happen when you step to the side?
  • Or stand up after going?

This all can change.  We need to re-train your body for the event in which leaking occurs.

Incontinence after birth

Running & Bladder Leaking

You’re going for a run and all of a sudden you feel it.  Take note.  What was happening in your run to cause the leaking?

  • Does it happen just when you reach the hill?
  • Did you think of something that caused you to stress?
  • Did your pelvic floor fatigue and you’re tired?

These are all reasons why you may experiencing leaking.

Your pelvic floor, the muscles that hold up your bladder, are part of a pressure system that runs from your the top of your mouth to your pelvis called your intra-abdominal pressure (IAP).

When one part of this system is compromised, say in childbirth when your pelvic floor may weaken, then the whole system is affected.

But don’t forget….

Women who’ve had a C-section, large tears, abdominal separations and episiotomies have increased pressure inside their body because their pressure system has been cut into.  Therefore, you may need more breath training then a friend who did not have these experiences. ¹

Similar, when you cough in excess, sneeze, run, or jump you increase the pressure and when the muscles are not activating correctly, the pressure moves out of the system; as in leaking.

Incontinence causes:

  • your pelvic floor muscles are weak/long
  • your pelvic floor muscles are short
  • caffeine and your diet may be causing inflammation and constipation
  • you may be in a high-stress response all day long
  • you may have had surgery that has compromised your pelvic floor/bladder area {C-section, episiotomy, or a large tear}
  • your exercise routine may be too intense for you right now
  • you’re overweight and it’s too much pressure downward
  • you have a forward head
  • your upper back is stiff
  • you’ve had a cold and have coughed for days
  • your sleep
  • your posture is poor
  • you are carrying two kids and groceries all at once!

So what’s the secret to stopping incontinence?

Incontinence Care


5 Little Known Facts To Stop Incontinence

#1 Reduce Constipation

The pressure of constipation {and even excessive coughing} weakens the pelvic floor and decreases its ability to hold in urine. Try these tips to reduce constipation.

  • Increase your daily water consumption – up to 8 Glasses/day.  Even if you’re worried about leaking.
  • Avoid caffeinated beverages as much as possible (as they can lead to dehydration)
  • Walk 30 minutes a day
  • Use the bathroom at the first urge to eliminate
  • Use the toilet at a consistent time every day
  • Minimizing consumption of constipating foods (like ice cream, meats, cheese, and high-fat foods
  • Increase adequate dietary fiber – 20-35g/day (i.e., fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans)
  • Add Flaxseed to your diet: Grind a cup of flaxseed and store in the refrigerator.
  • Take 1 tbs. of ground flaxseed and add to your food daily.

#2 Engage & Stretch Your Pelvic Floor

In a woman’s body, the pelvic floor muscles surround the urethra, vaginal opening, and anus. In addition to keeping the pelvic organs in place and the pelvic bones stable, the pelvic floor muscles are also responsible for:

    • The pleasurable muscle contractions felt in the genitals during orgasm. Orgasms feel bigger and stronger when the pelvic floor muscles are strong.
    • Comfortable vaginal penetration. The flexibility of the pelvic floor muscles is important for comfortable penetration.
    • Keeping urine inside the bladder at moments of unexpected belly pressure (laughing, coughing, lifting, sneezing, jumping).
    • Keeping stool inside the rectum until you consciously relax your pelvic floor to allow it to pass.

#3 Practice Diaphragmatic Breathing

Diaphragmatic breathing is a deeper breath with increased coastal expansion and it allows the abdominals to relax.  Think of breathing side by side like a bellow.  It regulates the pressure in the abdominal cavity and releases tension and tightness in the pelvic floor. 

Women say they feel tense or tight in their core and pelvic floor when they have incontinence. The diaphragmatic breathing releases this tension.

To do:

    1. Begin by sitting on a hard chair or bench and pull your “flesh away” so you feel your sitz bones.  If you are on the floor sit high on blocks or a firm cushion.
    2. Inhale-Envision the diaphragm moving downward, the abdomen contents are displaced outwards and the pelvic floor bulges slightly.
    3. Practice 3 ways: put both hands on your ribs and breathe into your hands 3-4x, place hands on your belly and allow it to push into your hands 3-4x, and last place hands on your collarbone and feel your breathe rise above your heart.

#4 Reduce Your Stress

As your bladder fills up it sends nerve messages to the brain to tell it when to empty your bladder.  When we “go to the bathroom, just in case”, we are actually decreasing the size of urine our bladder can hold therefore making the problem worse.  By relaxing your nervous system, you can change the response your brain triggers when your bladder is full.

Reducing stress is a multi-dimensional healing process.  Some steps you can take today are:

  • Incorporate meditation as often as possible to change your stress response
  • Drink caffeine-free teas
  • Add adaptogens to your diet
  • Exercise daily
  • Journal
  • Read this: 7 Natural Remedies For Everyday Stress

#5 Try Homeopathy

Homeopathy is safe, gentle and affordable and can be used with children and adults alike.  The key to homeopathy is finding the right remedy for your specific symptoms. The theory “like cures like” implies you are seeking the specific remedy for your unique symptoms.   Read about the remedies here.

In Conclusion

It’s easier than you think.  The first step in stopping incontinence is to tap into your breath.  Notice if you’re holding your breath during the day and when incontinence happens.  Breath holding, constipation, and your stress response increase your risk of leaking.  What’s stopping you from trying this?

Let me know in the comments below.


References

¹ Clint, Susan; The Whole Body Connect

² IAP with Functional Activities. Egger, et al. Reproducibility of Intra Abdominal Pressure Measured During Physical Activities Via a Wireless Vaginal Transducer. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg 2015;00: 1

²  Lift and carry conditions; Int Urogynecol J (2015)

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